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Terry Gault

Pete,

You are absolutely right: one of the best ways to seem genuine, accessible, and interesting during presentations is to use personal stories.

Using stories in presentations are beneficial in numerous ways. For instance, stories help you get into the “zone” of presenting. You are intimately familiar with the material and it’s easy to be more animated with an energetic, expressive voice and gestures when telling a story. I always suggest that you practice telling the story to friends and family members in informal settings. Continue to refine it to its most compact, crystallized form by selecting the pertinent details and then letting those details vividly delivered with expressive non-verbal behavior do the work. I GUARANTEE that you will find that storytelling will transform your professional and personal communications in powerful and pleasurable ways.

One thing to watch out for with telling stories is that you need to make it relevant. One way to do this is to weave your background and resume into a story. You will get to tout your experience while also gaining attention and building rapport. Use personal stories to make points. These are the elements that can make a story effective.
• Common reference points
• Characters
• Recognizable archetypes (Cheerleader, Office Gossip, The Grouch, Office Clown, Geek, Petty Gatekeeper, etc.)
• Conflict
• Details
• Dialog between characters
• A good segue back to your topic

Another good ideas is to fashion personal stories that show you in a vulnerable light (when you were struggling as a young sales rep, at your first job out of college, etc.) They will help you gain empathy and get the audience rooting for you.

Thanks for the post!

Terry Gault

Pete,

You are absolutely right: one of the best ways to seem genuine, accessible, and interesting during presentations is to use personal stories.

Using stories in presentations are beneficial in numerous ways. For instance, stories help you get into the “zone” of presenting. You are intimately familiar with the material and it’s easy to be more animated with an energetic, expressive voice and gestures when telling a story. I always suggest that you practice telling the story to friends and family members in informal settings. Continue to refine it to its most compact, crystallized form by selecting the pertinent details and then letting those details vividly delivered with expressive non-verbal behavior do the work. I GUARANTEE that you will find that storytelling will transform your professional and personal communications in powerful and pleasurable ways.

One thing to watch out for with telling stories is that you need to make it relevant. One way to do this is to weave your background and resume into a story. You will get to tout your experience while also gaining attention and building rapport. Use personal stories to make points. These are the elements that can make a story effective.
• Common reference points
• Characters
• Recognizable archetypes (Cheerleader, Office Gossip, The Grouch, Office Clown, Geek, Petty Gatekeeper, etc.)
• Conflict
• Details
• Dialog between characters
• A good segue back to your topic

Another good ideas is to fashion personal stories that show you in a vulnerable light (when you were struggling as a young sales rep, at your first job out of college, etc.) They will help you gain empathy and get the audience rooting for you.

Thanks for the post!

Terry Gault

Pete,

You are absolutely right: one of the best ways to seem genuine, accessible, and interesting during presentations is to use personal stories.

Using stories in presentations are beneficial in numerous ways. For instance, stories help you get into the “zone” of presenting. You are intimately familiar with the material and it’s easy to be more animated with an energetic, expressive voice and gestures when telling a story. I always suggest that you practice telling the story to friends and family members in informal settings. Continue to refine it to its most compact, crystallized form by selecting the pertinent details and then letting those details vividly delivered with expressive non-verbal behavior do the work. I GUARANTEE that you will find that storytelling will transform your professional and personal communications in powerful and pleasurable ways.

One thing to watch out for with telling stories is that you need to make it relevant. One way to do this is to weave your background and resume into a story. You will get to tout your experience while also gaining attention and building rapport. Use personal stories to make points. These are the elements that can make a story effective.
• Common reference points
• Characters
• Recognizable archetypes (Cheerleader, Office Gossip, The Grouch, Office Clown, Geek, Petty Gatekeeper, etc.)
• Conflict
• Details
• Dialog between characters
• A good segue back to your topic

Another good ideas is to fashion personal stories that show you in a vulnerable light (when you were struggling as a young sales rep, at your first job out of college, etc.) They will help you gain empathy and get the audience rooting for you.

Thanks for the post!

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